Jessica Elenstar

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Count us among the carless!
We had scaled down to just one car when we moved to our new apartment, and were looking for the right opportunity to go completely car-free. C’s new job is metro-accessible, so we sold our hatchback to Carmax today.
It’s interesting to see how people react when we tell them we won’t have a car anymore. Usually a mix of envy and horror. We have such easy access to public transportation and flexible rental options (like Zipcar) that it was a no-brainer to give car-free living a try. I can’t wait to see how it goes.
peterfromtexas:

How public transportation can reduce congestion

Count us among the carless!

We had scaled down to just one car when we moved to our new apartment, and were looking for the right opportunity to go completely car-free. C’s new job is metro-accessible, so we sold our hatchback to Carmax today.

It’s interesting to see how people react when we tell them we won’t have a car anymore. Usually a mix of envy and horror. We have such easy access to public transportation and flexible rental options (like Zipcar) that it was a no-brainer to give car-free living a try. I can’t wait to see how it goes.

peterfromtexas:

How public transportation can reduce congestion

"We get to invent every single day."

Highlights from Lisa Welchman’s eloquent and insightful remarks on digital governance at a Content Strategy DC meetup this week:

On the 25th anniversary of the web — “Can you believe it’s been this long and it’s still so messed up?” but also “We get to invent every single day.”

On internal teams — If there’s collaboration, things get done. If there’s competition, things break down. Of course, collaborative discussion is great, but someone needs to be in charge of deciding. That’s why governance is so important.

On governance — Most people don’t think about the ecosystem in which they work, let alone document it. Once you disrupt a system, you have to formalize (lightly) the new standards so they stick.

On firing — Letting someone go shouldn’t always be considered callous. It’s not fair to make high-performers suffer the substandard work of “problem children.” If you want the best possible team, you might have to make tough decisions.

On power — No one can give you authority. You have to find someone higher up in the organization who will empower you to direct and decide. One good way to get things rolling is to build consensus with peers and other teams at low to mid levels, then make your case to executives.

I love how she approached this conversation about her work with a sense of gratitude, but was very direct and no-nonsense. Can’t wait to read her book when it comes out later this year.